Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Death Trap - Finished

Death Trap- 11' x 14" digital and graphite by Greg Newbold
I posted the full value drawing for this piece a few days back. It will be reproduced as a poster and playbill cover for a production of Death Trap this coming season at Pioneer Theatre Company. I have been working on the final art the last couple of days and just finished things up. I decided to keep the background relatively unsaturated to create contrast and also to allow the background elements to recede. I really like how this turned out and in case you were curious, I painted it digitally using Photoshop.

4 comments:

Mike Blake illustration said...

You really have made a successful transition to digital. I'll bet it is nice having editability always at your fingertips, not having to worry about paints and brushes, or not having to photograph or scan your finished piece in...

Greg Newbold said...

Mike, Those are all definite advantages as well as the speed. Drawbacks include fewer accidental textures, a very non organic process with no tactile response and no physical artifact left over from the process, but that's how illustration is going these days. It also seems that the majority of clients seem to expect digital, at least on the delivery end. All in all, it's a trade off that I am willing to accept.

JTiago Fernandes said...

What about time?
I know the ink doesn't have to dry but it's still time consuming, right? How many hours do you spend in average on a digital illustration?

Greg Newbold said...

In the beginning, digital was actually slower than paint, mostly because I was still learning the software. Once I learned a few things and worked out a process, it became much faster. My acrylic paintings would sometimes take 3-5 days of work, the digital ones can now take only 2-3 days, depending on the complexity. Small spots sometimes only take a few hours, so in most cases, it seems I can cut my production time in about half. I recently did a couple of illustrations in paint that seemed to go really quickly though, so I am tempted to see if I can make paint faster now as a result of the things I have learned working digitally. We'll see...